Ho Ho Horror: Christmas Horror Fiction (Call for Submissions)

The Australian Literature Review is seeking submissions of 4,000-10,000 word short stories from Australian authors for a Christmas horror anthology to be titled Ho Ho Horror: Christmas Horror Fiction, until midnight September 30th.

The inspiration for this anthology came from a short story sent in by novelist/graphic novelist/picture book author Gordon Reece, which will feature in the book.

Email your submissions to auslit@hotmail.com.

Ho Ho Horror is intended for adult readers. It will be commercially published as a print book and ebook. Multiple submissions are allowed.

TIP: Many amateur horror writers saturate their writing with swearing, ripping off of bodyparts, decaying flesh, etc. Before sending in a story like this, think if such things are actually integral to your story (that is, what major contribution does their inclusion make to your story?). The focus of great horror stories tend to be on understanding the thoughts and actions of characters in a high-stakes conflict situation (usually in which the goal of at least one character is mutually exclusive to the goal of at least one other character and their is an element of time pressure to determine which character’s goal will win out).

You can get some first-hand tips on submissions from editor Steve Rossiter by attending the launch of Australian Literature: A Snapshot in 10 Short Stories – Gold Coast (April 27th), Sydney (May 2nd) and Melbourne (May 3rd).

Each author will receive 4% of revenue received by The Australian Literature Review from sales of the anthology minus any direct costs of production/distribution (if there are any not already covered by distributors).

MiceA Christmas Carol / A Christmas TreeThe Mammoth Book of Best New Horror: The World's Premier Annual Showcase of Horror and Dark Fantasy Fiction: v. 21 (Mammoth Books)It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Zombies: A Book of Zombie Christmas CarolsOn Writing Horror: A Handbook by The Latke Who Couldn't Stop Screaming: A Christmas StoryThe Stupidest Angel: A Heartwarming Tale of Christmas TerrorKrampus!: The Devil of Christmas

The Australian Literature Review
www.auslit.net

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11 Responses to Ho Ho Horror: Christmas Horror Fiction (Call for Submissions)

  1. Alan Baxter says:

    Any details on payment?

    • auslit says:

      Hi Alan,

      Thanks for your question.
      Some payment details have been added into the post.
      If you have any further questions, feel free to ask.

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  5. Lucy Bignall says:

    Don’t suppose it’s worth sending anything shorter than 4000 words?

    • AusLit says:

      There will be a strong preference for stories within the word limit.
      Since there is still almost 3 months for writers to get stories in, there should be a good selection of stories which are within 4,000-10,000 words.

  6. I love the inspiration for the anthology. The book is not computerised entirelu yet with you lot around to do this thing.

  7. Good on yer. A human response to an unsolicited submission can inspire an anthology. Yippeedoda.

    Christina

  8. vilutheril says:

    Hi! Sounds great!
    I was just wondering how much ‘Christmas’ the submissions should contain. For instance, is a horror story set on Christmas eve acceptable, even if the horror elements are not particularly Christmas related?

    Michelle

    • AusLit says:

      A horror story set on Christmas eve is acceptable. Just keep in mind that since the title clearly indicates to readers that it is Christmas horror you should have some engagement with the Christmas eve setting.
      The horror does not have to arise from the Christmas element, such as an evil Santa. The story could be about a killer who terrorises someone when it happens to also be Christmas eve.

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